State & Federal Regulations

California Healthy Kids Survey (CHKS)

ABOUT THE CALIFORNIA HEALTHY KIDS SURVEY (CHKS)

The California Healthy Kids Survey (CHKS) is an anonymous, confidential survey for use in Grades 5-12 that can help schools and districts accurately identify areas of local student health risks and behaviors, school connectedness, protective factors, and school violence. It provides a comprehensive, data-driven, decision-making process to guide efforts on improving the school climate and student learning environment, as well as identify and increase the quality of health, prevention, and youth development programs.

At the heart of the CHKS is a broad range of key learning and health-related indicators that are used to collect student data on attitudes, behaviors, and experiences related to school and learning. School connectedness, developmental supports and opportunities, safety, violence and harassment, substance use, and physical and mental health are some of the key areas assessed by the survey.


DISTRICT/SCHOOL REPORTS

2020-2021 Reports

Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA)

Overview

Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) is a federally-enacted law governing elementary and secondary education,  it affects states and school districts in four basic ways.  These changes support the district's current focus on delivering a strong standards-based educational program designed to improve student achievement.

Effect for District Schools

  • Greater accountability for results

  • Increased district flexibility for spending federal money

  • Expanded options for parents

  • Increased emphasis on teaching methods that have been proven to work

  • All schools will receive Federal Title I funds as set forth in the ESEA.  The district and schools receiving these funds must ensure that they are meeting the educational needs of low-achieving students in high-poverty schools and working to close the achievement gap between high and low-performing students. 
    Parents whose children attend Title I schools may request information from their schools about the professional qualifications of their children’s classroom teachers, including any paraprofessionals working in the classrooms with their children

  • Teacher Qualification Information Request Form

  • The state has designated some Title I schools as Program Improvement schools.  Based on the test scores of students, these schools have not made adequate yearly progress for two consecutive years.  A chart showing the designated schools is included on the Elementary and Secondary Education Act Fact Sheet (English).  District schools not listed may still be affected by ESEA because they may be identified to be receiving schools for students electing to leave Program Improvement schools.

Parent Notification and Involvement
The Elementary and Secondary Education Act requires that districts provide information to parents about a variety of education-related issues.  Many of these notifications are provided in letters sent directly to parents at their homes.

There are many ways that parents can be involved in their child’s education.  This includes participating at school events, on school advisory committees, in the classroom, and by providing supports for a child’s learning at home.  We encourage parents to talk with their child’s teacher and principal about these opportunities.

Districts in Program Improvement
The Federal Title I program provides assistance to districts serving students from high-poverty backgrounds. The Elementary and Secondary Education Act requires that all Title I districts make adequate yearly progress in improving student achievement. The state has established annual student achievement targets to determine whether districts are making adequate progress. The state has designated some Title I districts as Program Improvement (PI) districts. These districts have not made adequate yearly progress in improving student achievement for two or more consecutive years based on state test scores.

Schools in Program Improvement
The Federal Title I program provides assistance to schools serving students from high-poverty backgrounds. The Elementary and Secondary Education Act requires that all Title I schools make adequate yearly progress in improving student achievement.  The state has established annual student achievement targets to determine whether schools are making adequate progress.  The state has designated some Title I schools as Program Improvement (PI) schools.  These schools have not made adequate yearly progress in improving student achievement for two or more consecutive years based on state test scores.  Schools not listed may still be affected by ESEA because they may be identified as receiving schools for students electing to leave PI schools.

Program Improvement Year 1 – School Choice
Parents of students attending a school that is in Year 1 of Program Improvement may apply to enroll their child in a non-Program Improvement school and receive transportation to the school at district expense.  Procedures for school choice and transportation are as follows: if a child attends a PI school, the parent has the right to request a transfer to another designated school in the district that has not been identified as PI.  The designated school is determined by the student’s residence.  If a parent selects this option through the PI School Choice Program (PISC), transportation will be provided according to district practices and procedures.  PISC applications and specific information about the schools that a child may be eligible to attend are available at the child’s current school or in the district office.  In order for a child to be eligible for transfer to a non-PI school for the 2015-2016 school year, completed applications must be received in the district office by July 17, 2015.  As called for in the law, priority for transfers will be extended to the lowest-achieving students from low-income families.  It is possible that not all transfer requests will be granted if the number of requests exceeds the available funding for the program.  Transportation for a student to a non-PI school will no longer be provided when the student’s resident school meets its student achievement targets for two consecutive years and exits PI.

Program Improvement Year 2 – Supplemental Educational Services (SES)
In addition to the school choice option listed under Program Improvement Year 1, schools in the second year of Program Improvement are required to offer Supplemental Educational Services to students through programs offered outside of school.  As a result of limited funding, the lowest-achieving students from low-income families will be given priority for receiving Supplemental Educational Services.

Program Improvement Year 3 – District Corrective Action Plan 
In addition to School Choice Program (described in Year 1) and Supplemental Educational Services (described in Year 2) during the third year of Program Improvement, the school must work with the district to make corrective actions to improve student achievement.  This may include more direct support and oversight from the Superintendent or other district staff, new curriculum and instructional strategies, extending the school day or school year, assistance from an outside expert, changing some school staff, or other actions based on the needs of the school.  As this plan is developed for a school, parents will have an opportunity to learn about and comment on the plan.

Program Improvement Year 4 – Restructuring
In addition to School Choice Program (described in Year 1) and Supplemental Educational Services (described in Year 2) and in accordance with the Elementary and Secondary Education Act the district is required to restructure a school that has entered Year 4 of Program Improvement status.

Under the law, the alternative governance of the school must include at least one of the following actions: 1) Replace all or most of the school staff, which may include the principal, who are relevant to the school’s inability to make adequate progress; 2) Enter into a contract with an entity, such as a private management company, to operate the school as a public school; 3) Turn the operation of the school over to the state educational agency (e.g., California Department of Education, if the action is permitted under state law and the state agrees); 4) Reopen the school as a public charter school, or 5) Implement any other major restructuring of the school’s governance to improve student academic achievement and that has the substantial promise of enabling the school to make AYP.

Program Improvement Year 5 – Restructuring Implementation
In Program Improvement Year 5 and above, the school implements the restructuring plan developed in year 4.

Academic Performance Index (API)

California’s comprehensive accountability system monitors the academic achievement of all the state’s public schools that serve students in kindergarten through grade twelve.  This accountability system is based on state requirements, established by the Public Schools Accountability Act (PSAA) of 1999, and on federal requirements, established by the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA).  The Academic Performance Index is currently on hold during the implementation of the California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress (CASPP).

Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP)

A statewide accountability system mandated by the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 which requires each state to ensure that all schools and districts make Adequate Yearly Progress.  The Adequate Yearly Progress is currently on hold during the implementation of the California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress (CASPP).

Program Improvement (PI)

All Title I funded schools and local educational agencies (LEAs)
that do not make Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) are identified for Program Improvement (PI) under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA).

Title III English Learner Accountability Plan

Title III Year 4 Plan

Highly Qualified Paraprofessionals

Under ESEA, paraprofessionals who directly assist with instruction in a classroom setting, and whose site or department receives Title I funding, must comply with the new minimum qualification requirements.  To ensure that all students will benefit from the intent of ESEA, the district has determined that all paraprofessionals, regardless of how the site receives its funding, must comply with these new requirements.

View the Highly Qualified Paraprofessional Requirement Fact Sheet

Related Resources

Supplemental Services

Supplemental educational services (SES) are additional academic instruction provided outside of the regular school day and designed to increase the academic achievement of students attending schools in Program Improvement (PI) Years 2 through 5.

Educating Homeless Students
Title IX of The Elementary and Secondary Education Act requires, among other things, that the district notify parents in homeless situations of their child’s educational rights under this act.  The Empire Union School District provides schools with materials that help explain parents’ rights under ESEA.

Homeless Education - CalEdFacts

The term homeless children and youth mean individuals who lack a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence. This definition also includes:

  • Children and youth who are sharing the housing of other persons due to loss of housing, economic hardship, or a similar reason

  • Children who may be living in motels, hotels, trailer parks, shelters, or awaiting foster care placement

  • Children and youth who have a primary nighttime residence that is a public or private place not designed for or ordinarily used as regular sleeping accommodation for human beings

  • Children and youth who are living in cars, parks, public spaces, abandoned buildings, substandard housing, bus or train stations, or similar settings, or

  • Migratory children who qualify as homeless because they are children who are living in similar circumstances listed above

 Contact Information

Empire Union School District – Instructional Services Department  /  (209) 521-2800 – Phone  /  (209) 526-6421 – Fax

Drugs, Alchohol, Tabacco (TUPE)

Drug, Alcohol, Tobacco Education

Information for science-based programs and activities that effectively prevent alcohol, tobacco, and other drug use; and include social influences or life skills curricula and youth development.

Prevention Resources for Underage Drinking
Information and resources for the prevention of underage drinking.

Al-Anon/Alateen
A number of self-help, 12 step groups, exists for spouses, family members, and friends of alcoholic persons. Some Spanish groups available. For more information call the Hotline (209) 524-3907.

Alcoholics Anonymous
A number of self-help, 12 step groups to help the alcoholic person to achieve and maintain sobriety. Groups for Spanish-speaking also available. For information call the Hotline 209-572-2970.

Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities
Supports programs that prevent violence in and around schools; prevents the illegal use of alcohol, tobacco, and drugs; and involves parents and communities.

Science-Based Programs
Programs for which scientifically-based research has provided evidence to indicate that the program will reduce violence and illegal drug use.

Steroids and Dietary Supplements
Information on Senate Bill 37 and the United States Anti-Doping Agency's Guide to Prohibited Substances and Prohibited Methods of Doping.

Student Assistance Programs (SAPs) 
Provides information for implementing new Student Assistance Programs (SAPs) along with resources for strengthening existing SAPs.

Tobacco-Use Prevention Education Program
Provides funding through an application process for tobacco-specific student instruction, reinforcement activities, special events, intervention, and cessation programs for students.

Tobacco-Use Prevention Resources
Provides additional resources for tobacco-use prevention, intervention, and cessation.

Don't Quit Alone
Two Friends discuss the benefits of quitting smoking and how to do it.   English / Spanish

California Smokers’ Helpline  
A telephone-based program that can help you quit smoking. Helpline services are free, funded by the California Department of Health.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Smoking and Tobacco Use  
CDC's Office on Smoking and Health offers information related to smoking and tobacco use.

Helping Young Smokers Quit  
A national program supported by The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the National Cancer Institute.

LifeSkills

Student National Origin Report

Student National Origin Report (SNOR)

Para Español Oprima Aquí

The California Department of Education (CDE) collects the number of immigrant students to determine the amount of funding.

Eligible Immigrant Students.

As of July 1, 2009, sections, 3301(1) and (6) of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) defines immigrant children and youth as individuals who:

  • Are aged 3 through 21

  • Were not born in any state, and

  • Have not been attending one or more schools in any one or more states for more than three full (cumulative) academic years.

  • Section 3301(14) of the ESEA defines the State as each of the 50 States, the District of Columbia, and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico.

Note that the immigrant enrollment data include only those immigrant students who have not been attending a U.S. school for more than three full academic years. Immigrant students who have been enrolled longer than three years are not included in the data.

R30 Language Census

Language Census (Form R30-LC)

Para Español Oprima Aquí

The Language Census (form R30-LC) is an annual data collection that takes place in March and is used by the California Department of Education (CDE) to collect the following categories of data: number of English learner students (EL) and fluent-English-proficient (FEP) students in California public schools (kindergarten through grade twelve) by grade and primary language; the number of EL students enrolled in instructional settings or receiving services by type; the number of students redesignated from EL to FEP from the prior year; and the number of certified staff members providing instructional services to EL students. (R30-LC)

Note: English learner (EL) students were formerly known as limited-English-proficient (LEP) students. This change was made in the spring of 1999.

 

Why is it important?

  • Census data determines:

    • Supplemental funding (EIA-LEP and EIA-SCE funds)          

    • Demographic Shifts

    • Compliance in teacher certification

    • Compliance in student program placement

    • Compliance in implementation of programs for EL students